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Nelson Mosley selected as KU chief of police

The University of Kansas has selected the chief of the Rose Hill Police Department and former interim chief of Wichita PD to lead the office of public safety, according to a news release Monday.

“The chief of police and director of public safety at KU is responsible for providing leadership and direction for all operations of the Office of Public Safety,” according to the news release. “Mosley is tasked with formulating a strategic vision and mission for the department, developing policies, and making policy and procedural decisions of the department related to the operation and delivery of police services and the security of the university. The office implements procedures for enforcement of agency regulations, state and federal laws, and local ordinances. In his new position, Mosley is expected to work toward creating a diverse staff that contributes to a campuswide culture of care and helps everyone in the KU community feel they belong.”

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In an emailed response to some questions from the Times in June, Vice Provost Mike Rounds said, “As is the case with all university employee searches, the top candidate will undergo and clear a background check before any position offer is finalized.”

Monday’s release said that “As part of the hiring process for chief of police, Mosley is undergoing and must clear a KBI background check that is more extensive than those required of all new KU employees.”

Mosley is expected to begin his position on Sept. 17. Deputy Chief John Dietz has been filling in as interim chief since the retirement of Chief Chris Keary, and Dietz will continue that role until Mosley arrives.

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— Mackenzie Clark (she/her), reporter/founder of The Lawrence Times, can be reached via email at mclark (at) lawrencekstimes (dot) com or 785-422-6363.

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