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Artist Heap of Birds, who created ‘Native Hosts,’ to give virtual lecture

Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne, Arapaho), the artist who created the five-panel “Native Hosts” installation at the University of Kansas’ Spencer Museum of Art, will give a virtual lecture next week.

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Registration was open Tuesday for Heap of Birds’ lecture, “Land and Sovereignty: The Foundation for Public Art & Studio Practice,” which will be held at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 1.

Heap of Birds, an internationally recognized artist and alum of KU, “will speak about issues of place and power in his public artworks and studio practice,” according to information from the KU Art History DEAI Committee.

“Native Hosts,” which is KU’s Common Work of Art this year, is “just one example of Heap of Birds’ numerous and thought-provoking public interventions that acknowledge the historical displacement of Native Americans from their homelands and the contemporary presence of Native Americans across the Americas and the world.”

The lecture is presented by the Graduate Students of the History of Art DEAI Committee, the KU Kress Foundation Department of Art History, Spencer Museum of Art, Haskell Indian Nations University, and KU First Nations Student Association.

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Artist Heap of Birds, who created ‘Native Hosts,’ to give virtual lecture

Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne, Arapaho), the artist who created the five-panel “Native Hosts” installation at the University of Kansas’ Spencer Museum of Art, will give a virtual lecture next week.

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