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K-10 bridge work continues; Lexington Avenue to close for demolition of westbound bridge deck

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The westbound ramp from Kansas Highway 10 to Lexington Avenue in De Soto was set to close Thursday as workers prepare to demolish the westbound bridge deck this weekend.

Eastbound and westbound K-10 remain reduced to one lane in both directions through the project corridor as work is underway from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, according to the Kansas Department of Transportation.

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The expected completion date for the work, which started in early July, is mid-December.

The westbound exit ramp at Lexington Avenue will remain closed for the duration of the project. “Westbound K-10 traffic will be detoured to exit at Edgerton Road and turn to travel south, then enter eastbound K-10 and exit at Lexington Avenue,” according to KDOT.

Northbound and southbound Lexington Avenue at K-10 will be closed from 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 5 through 5 a.m. Monday, Aug. 8 as KDOT demolishes the existing bridge deck above.

The eastbound side of the bridge over Lexington Avenue was completed last year.

The work starts roughly 3.5 miles east of Eudora, and ends 2 miles west of the K-10/K-7 interchange, according to KDOT. On eastbound K-10, work continues on Cedar Creek Road and Cedar Creek Parkway bridges, and on westbound K-10, bridges at Evening Star Road, Sunflower Road, Lexington Avenue, Kill Creek, Camp Creek and Cedar Creek.

“These bridge improvements are a part of the KDOT Eisenhower Legacy Transportation Program (IKE) to invest in the future and critical infrastructure in Kansas,” according to KDOT.

Stay up to speed: Travelers can sign up for project updates from KDOT and see an interactive map of the work at this link.

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